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“COMMUNITY”

Author Sean Kirst discusses today’s theme

Eight years ago or so, when I began working with editors at the Syracuse University Press on “The Soul of Central New York,” the entire goal – and the success of the book – hinged on the notion of community.

At its heart, the book was a collection of columns I had written over what would turn into 27 years as a staff writer and columnist with The Syracuse Post-Standard. The idea was capturing – as a guy who first arrived here years ago from somewhere else – what I had sensed and hopefully shared over many years with readers about Syracuse and Central New York: It is a place of extraordinary physical beauty, heritage and shared experience that had – through decades of economic, environmental and cultural struggle – sometimes forgotten its own gentle but resounding claim to the extraordinary.

The idea of putting together such a a collection sounds simple. As I quickly learned, It was not. My early attempts contained too many columns, too many repetitive themes and too little of a focus. The first concept involved roughly 150 columns. In the end, in close partnership with editor Alison Maura Shay of the SU Press, she wisely convinced me to almost halve that number and create a narrative thread binding it together, with the first sentence connected to the last.

‘The Soul of Central New York’ offers accounts of some high-profile figures whose personal lives in some often intimate way had intersected with Syracuse or the region: Famed children’s author Eric Carle, then-Vice President Joseph Biden, anthropologist Jane Goodall, Onondaga Nation faithkeeper Oren Lyons, longtime Syracuse University basketball coach Jim Boeheim.

Yet they were simply part of the core notion of the book, which was illuminating how a network of seemingly everyday tales from a multitude of experiences – some involving the region’s defining and ongoing connection with the Onondagas – meshed together in a living definition of community.

Thus the fate of an elderly man who falls on a bitterly cold day on a downtown sidewalk, or the tale of a child raised amid struggle in a housing project whose chance encounter at a newsstand helps him ascend to a career as a bank executive, or the account of a woman born with cerebral palsy who formally turns out the lights of an institution that once overwhelmed her life …. these narratives became the spine, the foundation of the book.  

All told, it took five years to put together, and the process demanded that I jettison some of my own early preconceptions and focus on making it tighter, smaller and, hopefully, significantly more effective. The outcome was a reaction that I don’t think any of us expected: It became the fastest-selling book in the history of the Syracuse University Press, and a book intended to make at least a small and lasting statement on a sense of place, of joined identity.

For that, I am grateful to the editors and staff at the SU Press. Through their patience, and their belief in the larger theme, we attempted to create a quiet reminder of how struggle, pain and love, the core forces in any solitary life, are also the elements that forge true community – and provide the strength to last.

Sean Kirst, author of ‘The Soul of Central New York,’ was the recipient of journalism’s 2009 Ernie Pyle Award for human interest writing; he is now a columnist with The Buffalo News.

AAUP #UniversityPressWeek

“Speaking Up and Speaking Out”

Author Kelly Belanger discusses today’s theme

I’m in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, this week for a conference on Community Writing, a relatively modest-sized gathering of about 350 professors and local community members who see speaking out and speaking up on social issues as part of their personal and professional callings.

I find my colleagues’ commitments and passion inspiring, yet I don’t usually think of myself as an activist. I identify first as a writing teacher and a writer. I have spoken out on inequalities for women in sports by using my academic research skills and persisting in my quest to piece together a little-known history. I discovered how and why courageous individuals decided to speak out in the 1970s movement for gender equality in athletics. This movement took off in the 1970s when Congress, through Title IX, made sex discrimination illegal in federally funded schools.

Like some of the women I wrote about at Michigan State University, Temple, Brown, Texas my personality type is best described as introverted. Like Rollin Haffer at Temple, Marianne Mankowski at MSU, or Peggy Layne at Vanderbilt, I don’t typically seek public attention, and I prize harmonious relationships with friends, colleagues, and family. I value studying a problem from many angles, often waiting for others to speak and take the lead before offering my perspective.

But writing Invisible Seasons Title IX and the Fight for Equity in College Sports reminded me that social change movements require a symphony of voices, perspectives, and divergent rhetorical styles. Speaking up and speaking out is a responsibility. It’s a necessity. It has consequences and demands courage. When each of us, with our different styles and strategies, steps up to play our part, changes for the good of us all can begin.

Kelly Belanger, author of Invisible Seasons: Title IX and the Fight for Equity in College Sports is a professor of English and director of the university writing program at Valparaiso University.

2019 Veterans Writing Award Winner!

We are thrilled to announce the winner of the 2019 Veterans Writing Award is Dewaine Farria for his novel Revolutions of All Colors. Farria’s writing has appeared in the New York Times, CRAFT, Drunken Boat, Outpost Magazine, and on the Afropunk website. He is a frequent contributor to The Mantle. He holds an MA in International and Area Studies from the University of Oklahoma and an MFA in Creative Writing from the Vermont College of Fine Arts. As a U.S. Marine, Dewaine served in Jordan and Ukraine. Besides his stint in the military, Dewaine has spent most of his professional life working for the United Nations, with assignments in the Russian North Caucasus, Kenya, Somalia, and Occupied Palestine. He presently lives in the Philippines with his wife, daughter, two sons, two cats, and a dog.

Farria answered a few questions for us about his writing and what inspires him.

SUP: Has your military service influenced your writing? In what ways?

DF: The Marine Corps taught me how much of life revolves around consistency and habits. The discipline I developed in the Marine Corps helped shape my, “every morning, butt in the chair” approach to writing. Certainly, my time in the military also heavily influenced my thoughts on patriotism, masculinity, and violence—themes that frequently pop up in my work.

SUP: You’ve published both non-fiction and fiction in various print and online platforms. Do you see each as engaging with the reader in different ways?

DF: Good writing—whether it be poetry, fiction, or non-fiction—conveys truth. I consider myself a pretty forgiving reader. For a good story I’ll tolerate self-indulgent language, grammatical liberties, and slips in point of view. What I can’t abide is dishonesty; nothing disengages me from a piece of writing more quickly than the creeping desire to call “bullshit.” Convincing the reader to trust your narrator is the challenge and this is true regardless of genre or point of view—including for pieces with heavily journalistic elements (like this essay that I wrote for the New York Times last year).

SUP: What was the inspiration for this novel?

DF: My father inspired the novel. I built the book out of a short story called “Walking Point,” which contains a character loosely based on my dad. An early version of the story won second place in Line of Advance’s Colonel Darren L. Warren Writing Contest and can be found here.

SUP: Are you currently working on any writing projects?

DF: I’m about halfway done with a collection of short stories. Earlier this year, CRAFT published, “The Knife Intifada,” the first story from the collection. After I finish up these eight short stories, I plan to begin work on a collection of linked essays.

Celebrate Short Story Month this May!

Short stories are the perfect way to discover an author’s work, great for when you don’t have the time or mojo to commit to a 400 page novel, and a brainy impulse purchase on your phone or e-reader. This month we encourage you to pick up a new story collection or share one with a friend, and we have a few suggestions to get you started.

The Rebels

“The stories here show a great breadth, empathy for and insight into his subjects. His ability to move elegantly through different styles is not just a welcome addition to the Irish short story tradition but also a vital one.” —Books Ireland

Richard Power (1928-1970), an accomplished novelist, short story writer, and playwright, explores the life of of an Irish mother and adolescent girl in The Rebels. This collection of short stories captures the daily lives of urban and rural dwellers in Ireland at the turn of the twentieth century. He tackles themes of coming of age, the tensions between modern and traditional life, and romantic love in his beautiful and vivid tales. This memorable collection, arranged by James MacKillop, gives new life to Richard Power’s voice and the fans of the Irish short story tradition.

The Cocktail Hour

“I like a little mystery and for people to walk away from a story thinking of various possibilities. In terms of this collection as a whole, I would love readers to feel like they’ve been somewhere else for a few hours; somewhere that has been a little though-provoking; a place of meditation.” —Sophia Hillan, Author

The Cocktail Hour includes moving tales on the themes of sibling love and how it develops over time. These short stories retell the journey’s of various individuals in different periods of their lives. It includes one young boy’s contemplation of the wars in Ireland and Germany and it’s effect on his imaginative mind. One woman’s playful New York adventure and how it becomes a confrontation with external reality. And lastly, a dramatic monologue from one of Jane Austen’s bitter relatives that is directed at Austen herself.

Vilna My Vilna

“Jewish Vilna is forever gone, but this translation of Vilna My Vilna does much to keep its pale memory alive. Helen Mintz renders Karpinowitz’s slangy, colloquial Yiddish into a lively and idiomatic English and graces both Karpinowitz’s stories, and even Jewish Vilna itself, with a second life.
–Colorado Review


In this collection, Karpinowitz portrays, with compassion and intimacy, the dreams and struggles of the poor and disenfranchised Jews of his native city before the Holocaust. His stories provide an affectionate and vivid portrait of poor working women and men, like fishwives, cobblers, and barbers, and people who made their living outside the law, like thieves and prostitutes. This collection also includes two stories that function as intimate memoirs of Karpinowitz’s childhood growing up in his father’s Vilna Yiddish theater.

Impossibly Small Spaces

“I am interested in the vulnerable moments people can encounter. My characters often find themselves facing ordinary or extraordinary obstacles. Some will be graceful in these challenges and others will blunder, hurt others and themselves in the process. Fiction must feel emotionally authentic even as the situations and characters are pulled from my imagination. I believe we expand our understanding of human behavior through stories.”
Lisa C. Taylor, Author  

In Lisa Taylor’s second collection of short stories, a woman locks a man in an airplane bathroom, two brothers rewrite their past, and strangers in an airport are thrown together through tragedy. Taylor explores the ideas of confinement and expansion with both humor and angst, as characters of all ages and backgrounds are continually forced to redefine who they are, and how they think.

Who Will Die Last?

“All the stories are about people whose past struggles to fit their present-a rich and universal subject. Because the setting is Israel, these struggles can escalate into matters of life and death. Sometimes, as the title hauntingly indicates, Ehrlich’s characters triumph by simply dying last.”
Iowa Review

Both Hilarious and sad at the same time, Ehrlich’s collection of short stories, takes his characters on a tantalizing journey through their souls. His understated writing style transforms even the most heartbreaking plots into an uplifting and funny tale. Israel’s special unique history, landscapes, and conflicts add to the drama and passion of the collection. The themes discussed relate to gay life in Israel, loneliness, and the importance of community in time of sorrow and tragedy. Rather than a single translator, this collection was translated by various translators, bring out the diversity of voices in the stories.

Monarch of the Square

“Zafzaf offers visions of Moroccan culture and its traditions in an easygoing style that is well-nigh incomparable.”—World Literature Today

Monarch of the Square is Mohammed Zafzaf’s first collection of work that has been translated into English. This anthology is a tribute to his influence on an entire generation of Moroccan storytellers.
Zafzaf’s stories portray all aspects of Moroccan life and shows the struggle to survive in such a challenging place that is constantly changing. His writing explores the various myths, beliefs, and traditions that operate within his culture, while questioning it all in an easy-going, conversational manner.

These six books and the rest of our short story collection is available for purchase online at our website.

Put Poetry First this Month with Books from Sheep Meadow Press!

April is the month when the world celebrates the importance of poetry in our lives. To join the celebration we’re highlighting five books of poetry from our press and our distribution partner, Sheep Meadow Press. We hope these selections will spark your interest, and encourage you to read a poem, share a poem, or write your own poem.

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In the Alley of the Friend

In the Alley of the Friend is a translation of the Persian book Dar Kuy-e Dust which is about the fourteenth century poet Hafez, who is often recognized as the most original Persian poet of all time. Scholars have studied his work for centuries, exploring his life and his deeply moving poetry of love, spirituality, and protest. Ghanoonparvar’s translation of scholar Shahrokh Meskoob’s analysis of Hafez’s work provides profound insight into the poets thoughts and spirit.

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The Noise of the Rain

Sarah Plimpton’s The Noise of the Rain illustrates her collected poems with simplistic black on white and white on black drawings. Both an artist and poet, some have referred to her creations as being as quiet as the moments just before sleep, almost like preludes to dreams. Word choice and the way she arranges her poetry exudes a certain simple intensity. You can find her books in the The Museum of Fine Arts, The New York Public Library, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Winters Come, Summers Gone

Winters Come, Summers Gone is a collection of selected poems by the notable Howard Moss.
This book combines work from his first three published volumes with fourteen new poems. Moss was an American poet, critic, and the poetry editor of The New Yorker for nearly forty years. He wrote eleven books of poetry and even won the National Book award in 1972. Much of his poetry centers around the theme of love in its various forms.

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Perhaps Bag

Perhaps Bag is a collection of poems by acclaimed British poet Carol Rumens. Starting with her first set of poems in 1968 to her most recent and unpublished pieces from 2017, Rumens “retains her feminine voice but extends her sympathies beyond feminism” (Anne Stevenson). She has written fourteen books of poetry and currently serves as a Professor of Creative Writing at Bangor University, in Wales.

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Snow Part

Perhaps one of the most distinguishable poets of all time, Paul Celan, described Schneepart as his “strongest and boldest” book. It’s a response to the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia, and is a collection of poetry haunted by images of violence and resistance in a dark European century. Snow Part is the first published English translation of Schneepart. Its seventy poems were published in 1971, a year after Celan’s death. Translator Ian Fairley includes twenty posthumous poems that are closely related to the themes found in Schneepart.

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To learn more or purchase any of the books listed on this page, visit our website!


Discover The Grandest Madison Square Garden

Learn about Suzanne Hinman’s latest book in our interview where we discuss art, architecture, and scandal in 1890’s New York City.

The Grandest Madison Square Garden tells the story behind the 1890 construction of Madison Square Garden and the eighteen–foot nude sculpture of Diana, the Roman Virgin Goddess of the Hunt, that crowned it. Author Suzanne Hinman delves into the fascinating private lives of the era’s most prominent architect and sculptor, revealing the nature of their intimate relationship. She shows how both men created a new era of art which meshed European styles with American vitality. The Grandest Madison Square Garden tells the tale of architecture, art, and spectacle amid the elegant yet scandal-ridden culture of Gotham’s decadent era.

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Suzanne Hinman holds a PhD in American art history and has been a curator, gallerist, museum director, and professor. She served as the director of galleries at the Savannah College of Art and Design and was the associate director of the Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth. We interviewed Hinman about her experience writing The Grandest Madison Square Garden to better understand the ins and outs of this time in history.

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What inspired you to write about the lives and achievements of architect Stanford White and sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens?

It is so difficult to recall exactly, as I began more than 12 years ago, largely inspired, I would have to say, by the beauty of their creations, separately, and then even more so together. I had always loved the Italian-inspired architecture of McKim, Mead, and White, whether in New York, Boston, Washington, D.C. or anywhere else I could find it. I was also intrigued by the life of Stanford White, the most exuberant, amazing, creative of the three partners. When I first moved to New Hampshire, I visited the town of Cornish and discovered the incredibly beautiful work of Augustus Saint-Gaudens, set at Aspet, his home that sparked the beginning of the Cornish Art Colony and is now a National Historic Site. And when I discovered that these two men not just knew each other but were dearest friends who often collaborated together, it was even better.

I probably first discovered the Diana sculpture that topped the tower of Madison Square Garden while visiting the Metropolitan Museum in New York, where in a half-size version she welcomes visitors to the grand courtyard of the American Wing. It took a few years before I was able to see the actual surviving 1893 version Diana, reigning over the Great Stair Balcony at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and that was an amazing moment.

Which part of researching for the Grandest Madison Square Garden was the most personally interesting to you?

I truly loved it all. Of course, visiting archives that held the letters and notes actually written by my two key players, architect Stanford White and sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens, was definitely an incredible experience–touching (in gloves) the pieces of paper, holding them in my hands, studying the signatures, the extra bits written in the margins, and all the wonderful information they revealed. Among the most important collections were the Avery Architectural and Fine Art Library at Columbia and the New York Historical Society for the papers of Stanford White and the McKim, Mead & White firm. For Augustus Saint-Gaudens, it was the Saint-Gaudens Papers at Rauner Special Collections, Baker Library, at Dartmouth College.

The second major source of research information was the newspapers of the day, and that was quite exciting also, finding contemporary accounts written the very day, filled with so much information, much of which had not been seen or noted for more than a hundred years. I loved the detective work, stumbling on amazing new bits as I searched newspapers archives now so accessible online. The discoveries I made, including a long-forgotten scandal regarding Saint-Gaudens and his nude models and a new theory regarding the crime-of-the-century murder of White at the Garden were quite exciting!

Do you think your background in art history has influenced your writing style? If so, how?

I think it was an interwoven process, that my writing style derives from wanting to tell a good story and that led me to the field of art history. I fell in love with art and art history while still a teenager, when I wanted to know the stories behind the artists and their work. My background as an art historian has allowed me to know the sources and dive deeply into the research, but still, my goal remains telling a good story, not simply for an academic audience but for a general audience with an interest in art, architecture, history, life in the Gilded Age, and so forth. I should add that the book also examines significant elements of LGBTQ history, as well as the history of sports in America, so much of which occurred at Madison Square Garden.

What was the most difficult aspect of your twelve-year research and writing process?

There was no difficult aspect to the research and writing process. I absolutely loved it: from the excitement of discovery to putting the bits and pieces together into a good story that I could see unfolding inside my head. There was nothing I would rather do than sit at my computer in my messy little home office, spinning my straw into gold.

The difficult part came towards the end, finding just the right publisher who would realize the market for the book, that it was not written just for academics but for the general public and that there was a real audience for the subject. Luckily Syracuse University Press was that publisher, and the book fit neatly within their existing series on the history of New York state.

Why read The Grandest Madison Square Garden? (in 50 words or less)

To start with a couple of kind reviews, “it’s a splendid story,” as “vivid and enthralling as a novel,” revealing the fascinating private lives of the era’s most prominent architect and sculptor while telling the remarkable and sometimes scandal–ridden story behind the design and construction of the fabulous 1890 Madison Square Garden and the nude sculpture that crowned it.

New York, NY (1890)

Read more about The Grandest Madison Square Garden and purchase the text on the Syracuse University Press website today!

International Women’s Day

Celebrate International Women’s Day by checking out some of the Syracuse University Press’s many female-focused titles. We hope this selection of books written by women, about women, and about women studies will illuminate the impact females have had on society and the world.

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Sylvia Porter

Sylvia Porter: America’s Original Personal Finance Columnist discusses the life of one of the most admired women of the twentieth century. A pioneer for both male and female journalists, Porter established a new genre of newspaper writing while also carving a space for women in the male-dominated fields of finance and journalism. Tracy Lucht traces Porter’s professional legacy, identifying the strategies she used to pave the way for not only herself, but female writers everywhere.

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Athena’s Daughters

Athena’s Daughters: Televisions New Women Warriors examines the complex relationship between feminism and violence in popular television shows that feature women warriors. This book is made up of individual essays based in feminist theoretical debate about alternative feminist storytelling in the media. Editors Frances Early and Kathleen Kennedy provide a cutting-edge forum to recognize women’s increasing role in popular culture as action heroes.

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Running for All the Right Reasons

Running for All the Right Reasons: A Saudi-born Woman’s Pursuit of Democracy is the story of Ferial Masry, the first Saudi American to run for political office in U.S. history. As a recent immigrant and naturalized citizen, Masry surpassed all the odds by winning the write-in vote for the California State Assembly seat. This book recounts Masry’s childhood in Mecca and her decision to emigrate to the United States, as well as her career as an educator and her bold entry into the political sphere. Her journey is truly remarkable.

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Arab Women’s Lives Retold

Arab Women’s Lives Retold: Exploring Identity Through Writing is a collection of essays that challenges the stereotypes of Middle Eastern women by analyzing the autobiographical writing of various Arab novelists, poets, and artists. This book explores the ways female Arab writers have spoken about their roles and identities in different social settings. As a whole these writings provide a clearer picture on the impact of identity and global politics on Arab women’s rights.

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Editor’s Favorites

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Respectability & Reform

I’m extremely proud to have worked with Tara McCarthy on Respectability and Reform: Irish American Women’s Activism (1880–1920). McCarthy makes use of meticulous archival research to recount the ways Irish American women contributed to the women’s suffrage movement and Irish nationalist movement in America. With lively prose, compelling images, and exciting newspaper accounts, McCarthy gives us a provocative, informative, and important book about the vital role women play in social and political reform. It’s a model that is especially important to honor, learn from, and be encouraged by today.
Deborah Mannion, Acquisitions Editor

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Mihrî Hatun

Mihrî Hatun was an early Ottoman poet, far ahead of her time in the subversiveness and boldness of her work. She challenged traditional notions of gender in the Ottoman court when knowledge production was thought to belong solely to educated, elite men. I loved working on Didem Havlioglu’s elegant study of Mihrî—here, we get to read the poetry, understand this remarkable woman’s life, and recognize the foundational role she continues to play in the intellectual history of the Middle East.
Suzanne Guiod, Acquisitions Editor

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