Posts tagged “Syracuse University

A Word with Work Study Student Molly Estes

MollyWhen I tell people that I work at the Syracuse University Press office, they usually assume that I work for a newspaper or something along those lines.  However, I have found that book publishing is far more exacting, and interesting, than many people realize.

During my first year at Syracuse University, I have been unsure of where I want to take my studies.  As a major in Communications and Rhetorical Studies, there is a broad spectrum of fields which I can narrow down.  I have found working at the SU Press office rewarding and even enlightening to my future.  Having put much consideration into pursuing a double major with Modern Languages, I have found interest in the translated texts that the SU Press has published.

While working with the Author Spotlight blog feature, I was fortunate enough to hear a firsthand account of what the translation process is like.  Though I do not think book translation is the particular path I want to follow, I was reminded of the wide variety of opportunities that Modern Languages could offer.  In fact, I was induced to research translation jobs at places such as hospitals, accounting firms, etc.  This has made me very excited for my future years at Syracuse and I appreciate the opportunities of learning and enrichment that I’ve found at SU Press.

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SU Press and AcademicPub Team to Provide Lower Cost Content

At Syracuse University, and most other universities, textbooks are not cheap and students often resort to other options before making the costly purchase.  Syracuse University Press and Academic Pub are attacking the issue by teaming up to offer college textbooks at a more reasonable, student-friendly rate.

AcademicPub is a platform that offers customized print and digital academic material at a 60 percent discount.  Caroline Vanderlip, CEO of SharBook Inc., the parent company of AcademicPub, states that the platform “allows faculty to just select the chapters, journal articles, web documents, links and lectures that they want to use in their course, and basically compile one textbook out of it, instead of assigning multiple text books for purchase.”  The customization of course material into one book provides professors and students with a basic and affordable approach to academic learning.  Princeton, Harvard, Yale, Michigan, Cambridge and Oxford University Press are among the other 50 universities and academic publishers that have joined forces with the higher-education technology platform.  The program is available now for use on AcademicPub and will be accessible through SU Press within the next few weeks.

Syracuse University Press is excited to be part of AcademicPub and assist in extending the reach of academic content to large audiences at an affordable rate.  The press is committed to serving scholars and scholarship and hopes this partnership will help preserve the history, literature and culture of scholarly work.


Newest Issue of Stone Canoe Released, Number 7

Are you a fan of arts, literature, and social commentary?  Then you’re in luck because the Stone Canoe journal has released its newest issue, Number 7, filled with unique new content!  This year’s publication features over 60 artists contributing to a collection of poetry, fiction, drama, nonfiction, interviews, review, and visual arts.  Syracuse University Press is proud to distribute such a refined journal showcasing the work of writers and visual artists with a connection to Upstate New York.

Since its conception, Stone Canoe has expanded its range to include articles on technology, film, video, and music, while maintaining its traditional focus on poetry, short fiction and nonfiction, drama and visual arts.  The annual journal is published each spring by University College of Syracuse University and edited by Robert Colley.  Stone Canoe, Number 6, won the Gold Medal in the Anthology category of the IPPY Awards last June.  Visit the Stone Canoe website for additional content, along with e-book versions of current and past issues.

Stone Canoe, Number 7 will be available for purchase at the Syracuse University Press website.  See the photographs below for a sneak peek inside the newest edition!


Remembering Tracy Sugarman (1921-2013)

Beloved SU Press Author and Syracuse native Tracy Sugarman died Sunday, January 20 at the age of 91.  Sugarman was known for his nationally recognized illustrations which appeared in hundreds of magazines and books, and was featured on PBS, ABC TV, NBC TV, and CBS TV.  Along with his career as an illustrator, he also was a talented artist, scriptwriter, civil rights activist, producer, and author. He won numerous awards from the Society of Illustrators in New York and the Art Directors Club in Washington, D.C. and his entire collection of art from World War II was acquired by the U.S. Library of Congress.

With strong ties to the Syracuse region as a graduate of Nottingham High School and Syracuse University, Sugarman published two books with the we had sneakersSyracuse University Press.  Drawing Conclusions: An Artist Discovers His America (2007) and We Had Sneakers, They Had Guns: The Kids Who Fought for Civil Rights in Mississippi (2009) are both powerful records of the nation’s past expressed through the artist’s own words and drawings.  He is also the author of Stranger at the Gates: A Summer in Mississippi and My War: A Love Story in Letters and Drawings.

Tracy Sugarman will be remembered for his successful career and strong community presence.  He was a resident of his neighborhood in Westport, Connecticut for 62 years and touched the hearts of many whom he surrounded.  SU Press is saddened by the news and sends our deepest condolences to the family and friends of the distinguished artist.

Memorial service information will be announced in the spring.


SU Press “How-To” Series Announced!

Syracuse University Press has teamed with The Graduate School’s Future Professoriate Program (FPP) to provide a series of workshops and talks designed to shape academic authors.  The February edition of The Graduate Student Newsletter announced the “How-To” series with a full list of the upcoming events.  For more information on the FPP, visit their page on the Syracuse University website.

Full Newsletter available at http://www.syr.edu/gradschool/pdf/gs-newsletters/GS%20Newsletter%20Feb%202013.pdf.


Author Spotlight: K. Animashaun Ducre

Book: A Place We Call Home: Gender, Race, and Justice in Syracuse

K. Animashaun Ducre is a dedicatekishi3_color_fullsize (2)d advocate for environmental justice with four years of Greenpeace experience working as a toxics campaigner.  She received her PhD in environmental justice at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.  Currently, she is an assistant professor in the Department of African American Studies at Syracuse University.  Her new SU Press book, A Place We Call Home: Gender, Race, and Justice in Syracuse was published this month and is a wonderful addition to the Syracuse Studies on Peace and Conflict Resolution series.

Tell us about your new book, A Place We Call Home.

“My book is part memoir/part research on Black women who lived in depressed urban environments and how they cope.”

Have you always had an interest for environmental justice?  What led you to the field?

“I have always had an interest in social justice. As a child growing up in Washington DC and Maryland, my family and I were heavily involved in helping the homeless. Later, when I went to college, I worked on race relations during the height of the Rodney King beating and the acquittal of the officers involved. After graduation, my interest broadened to include both environmental rights and civil rights when I began to work for Greenpeace, an international environmental organization.  My work with Greenpeace led to my scholarship and advocacy on environmental justice.”

What was the biggest challenge you encountered while writing this book?

“The biggest challenge in writing this book, aside from carving out time from my teaching and other faculty duties, was finding the courage to present my own voice. Most academic research relies upon a degree of objectivity and a presumption of distance between the researcher and the subject. However, the reader knows by the first few sentences of my book that my life and experience are a significant part of the narrative. Adopting a Black feminist perspective in my research and writing gave me the confidence to present my work in this manner.  Writers like bell hooks and the late Audre Lorde were influential in my decision to present my work in this manner.”

What types of research did you conduct before writing this case study?  How many years of research?

“I am versed in both quantitative and qualitative research. My dissertation, written in 2005 is based solely on spatial statistics. When I came to Syracuse, I relied upon the resources available in the Department of African American studies to hone my qualitative skills. We are the only department at Syracuse University to house our very own library (the Martin Luther King, Jr.) and specialist librarian, as well as operate our own visual and cultural arts center (the Community Folk Art Center).  The Community Folk Art Center hosted the photography exhibition that arose from this research in 2007.”A Place We Call Home

What did you find most eye-opening about your research?

“I was surprised by how well the participants in the project were familiar with maps. In my experience, understanding maps presents a challenge.”

Describe your favorite experience while writing A Place We Call Home?

“I look forward to the presentation of the participants’ photos each during the project. Some of the photos are featured in the book. It was interesting to see each image and to listen to how each woman presented the photo. Often, the image was not enough to understand the concept – you had to hear each woman discuss the elements of the photo that appealed to her.”

What is the most beneficial aspect of your occupation?

“I like teaching.  I like challenging my students to think critically about society. I also like research – asking questions and seeking answers. I have worked on different dimensions of environmental justice – from calculating the amount of air pollution with statistics, to browsing through old plantation records at an archive, to analyzing photographs by the women in this Photovoice project.”

What can we expect from you next?

“Speaking of old plantation records, I have accumulating information about a sugar plantation in Southern Louisiana that later was bought by a chemical manufacturer. I want to highlight this connection between plantation-to-plant and this particular site’s effect on the Black community that surrounds it. I think there are some interesting parallels between the oppression of slavery and the oppression of a polluting industry.  I’m also working on edited volume that looks at environmental injustice and schooling – my chapter focuses on case studies where hazardous industry are located near elementary schools and we can do to prohibit this.”

For more information on K. Animashaun Ducre’s new book, A Place We Call Home, visit the Syracuse University Press website or attend her book talk on Thursday, February 7th at the Community Folk Art Center in Syracuse, NY.  See the Events page for more details on this upcoming event.


SU Press Book Display at SU Bookstore

Stop into the SU Bookstore to view the special SU Press book display in honor of University Press Week,  last week (November 11 – November 17).  The display will remain up for the entire year.

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