Posts tagged “Irish Studies

New Arrival!

Carmilla: A Critical Edition
By Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu, Edited by Kathleen Costello-Sullivan

CarmillaFirst serialized in the journal “The Dark Blue” and published shortly thereafter in the short story collection In a Glass Darkly, Le Fanu’s 1872 vampire tale is in many ways the overlooked older sister of Bram Stoker’s more acclaimed Dracula. A thrilling gothic tale, Carmilla tells the story of a young woman lured by the charms of a female vampire.

This edition includes a student-oriented introduction, tracing the major critical responses to Carmilla, and four interdisciplinary essays by leading scholars who analyze the story from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Ranging from politics to gender, Gothicism to feminism, and nineteenth-century aestheticism to contemporary film studies, these critical yet accessible articles model the diverse ways that scholars can approach a single text. With a glossary, biography, bibliography, and explanatory notes on the text, this edition is ideal for students of Irish and British nineteenth-century literature.

“Costello-Sullivan’s exciting new edition of Le Fanu’s Carmilla, the sly 1872 Anglo-Irish vampire tale that laid the groundwork for the arguably less subtle Dracula, productively returns to the text’s original serialized publication format….This book is suitable for both undergraduates and advanced scholars of gender, sexuality, and Irish and film studies alike.”
—Mary Burke, author of‘Tinkers’: Synge and the Cultural History of the Irish Traveller


Author Spotlight: Sinéad Moynihan

Book: “Other People’s Diasporas”: Negotiating Race in Contemporary Irish and Irish-American Culture

Sinead website picSinéad Moynihan is a lecturer in twentieth-century literature at the University of Exeter.  In addition to several book chapters and articles, she is the author of Passing into the Present: Contemporary American Fiction of Racial and Gender Passing. After awarded an Early Career Fellowship by the Leverhulme Trust in 2007, Moynihan started writing her newest Syracuse University Press title, to be published this April, “Other People’s Diasporas”: Negotiating Race in Contemporary Irish and Irish-American Culture.

Tell us about “Other People’s Diasporas.”

Other People’s Diasporas” is concerned with Irish and Irish-American cultural production in the context of unprecedented in-migration to Ireland during the Celtic Tiger.  How did Irish writers, filmmakers, dramatists and stand-up comics confront Ireland’s changed demographics in their work? I argue that they did so by mediating these contemporary concerns about Ireland through narratives that (re)imagined Irish diasporic experience in the United States.  For example, Joseph O’Connor wrote a novel about emigration to New York during the Great Famine at precisely the moment when immigration into Ireland was at its peak.  How are we to interpret this gesture? The book is divided into five chapters, two on contemporary Irish writers (Joseph O’Connor and Roddy Doyle), one on Irish and Irish-American drama (Donal O’Kelly and Ronan Noone), one on stand-up comedy (Des Bishop) and one on Irish and Irish-American cinema (The Nephew and In America).”

Could you briefly describe the economic growth under the “Celtic Tiger?”

“From about the mid-1990s on, Ireland entered a period of unprecedented economic growth.  The Irish economy expanded at a rate of about 9.4% between 1995 and 2000 and this growth continued, though not at the same rate, until 2008.  The first recorded use of the expression “Celtic Tiger” was by Kevin Gardiner of Morgan Stanley in London, who drew a comparison between Ireland’s growth and the Asian “tiger” economies.  This expansion had enormous consequences for Ireland: for the first time, it effectively boasted full employment, many emigrants of the 1980s and early 1990s returned to Ireland to live, property prices soared and, the issue in which I’m interested, suddenly immigration began to exceed emigration by a wide margin.  The years of the “boom” or the “economic miracle” lasted until about 2008, when Ireland, like many other countries worldwide, was hit by a severe recession.”

What kind of obstacles did the new immigrants in Ireland face?

“It’s very difficult to generalise about this, since there were so many “categories” of immigrant to Ireland during the Celtic Tiger years and, of course, each individual person has a wide range of experiences.  There were many immigrants from EU countries.  For example, the Polish –  who tended to be white, Catholic and had good English, or were very willing to learn it – perhaps found Ireland more welcoming than other immigrants did, simply because, to Irish natives, they seemed less “different” or “other.”  On the other hand, asylum-seekers had a very difficult time because they weren’t permitted to work while their application for asylum was being considered and they were often housed in small towns in the midlands or the west of Ireland (because this was cheaper than housing them in urban areas) .  Those communities had often had few or no encounters with ethnic minorities prior to their arrival.”

other-peoples-diasporasHow was the arrival of immigrants in the rising economy beneficial for the Irish natives?  How was it detrimental?

“It was beneficial in any number of ways.  Most practically, and in purely economic terms, many immigrants took jobs that Irish natives, more affluent than previously, were now unwilling to take.  They were therefore responsible for the provision of many services, without which the economy would not have run as smoothly or as successfully.  This is in line with what has happened in other economically successful countries around the world which began to attract migrants because of the availability of work.  The downside to this, of course, is that as soon as there is a downturn in the economy, as has happened in Ireland, Irish natives are more likely to see immigrants as “taking” jobs that would otherwise be available for them.  I try to grapple with some of these issues in the epilogue to my book.”

What did writing this book entail?

“The groundwork of this project was laid as early as 2005, when I presented a paper on Jim Sheridan’s In America at a Transatlantic Studies conference in Nottingham, where I was undertaking my Ph.D. on an unrelated subject.  I read the film in the context of the referendum on Irish Citizenship of June 2004.  When that referendum took place, I had only been living in England for nine months.  I was so incensed by the implications of it that I went back to Ireland to vote against it, not that this did any good, since 79% of the population voted in favour of it.  By the time I finished my Ph.D. and applied for postdoctoral funding, which I was awarded, I was absolutely sure that I wanted my next project to about the implications of this referendum and how questions of race and immigration were being negotiated in contemporary Irish culture.  I had two years in which to complete the project, which I did.  It was a straightforward book to write, partly because I was so impassioned by the subject matter and partly because I had very good access to Irish media and popular culture, through frequent visits back to Ireland and through friends and relatives who did a lot of information-gathering on my behalf.”

Can you explain the title “Other People’s Diasporas”?  How did you come up with it?

“The term “Other People’s Diasporas” is taken from a quotation by sociologist Steve Garner.  In the early days of researching this book, I read his book, Racism in the Irish Experience (2004), where he poses the question: “Yet what happens when other people’s diasporas converge on the homeland of a diasporic people?” What I really liked was that embedded in the term “other people’s diasporas” was the implication of a connection between both historical emigration and contemporary immigration to Ireland.  I was interested in precisely this connection.  In other words, how have Irish writing, cinema, stand-up comedy and so on responded to the influx of immigrants to Ireland during the Celtic Tiger years? They have done so by mediating their concerns through narratives of emigration to the U.S.”

For more information on Moynihan’s engaging exploration “Other People’s Diasporas,” visit the Syracuse University Press website.  It’s available for pre-order now!


Author Spotlight: Richard Lawrence Jordan

Book: The Second Coming of Paisley: Militant Fundamentalism and Ulster Politics

Richard Jordan Richard Lawrence Jordan received his PhD in modern British history from Louisiana State University.  He was awarded the 2009 Adele Dalsimer Prize for Outstanding Dissertation from the American Conference of Irish Studies and the Distinguished Dissertation Award from Louisiana State University.  Jordan’s new book, The Second Coming of Paisley, provides a detailed examination of the relationship between the Reverend Ian Paisley and leaders of the militant wing of evangelical fundamentalism in the United States.

Describe the types of research you conducted for The Second Coming of Paisley?

“The research for this book was undertaken for my dissertation while at Louisiana State University, was fairly straight forward and involved the libraries and archives of Northern Ireland (Queen’s University, Belfast Central Library, Linenhall Library, Union Theological College etc.) and those in the United States.  These included those of numerous universities, but most notably the Carl McIntire Collection (Special Collection, Princeton Theological Seminary), and the Mack Library and Fundamentalism File at Bob Jones University in Greenville, South Carolina.”

What sort of conflict did Paisley experience over the years?

“Paisley has created a substantial amount of controversy during his career, which began shortly after embarking on his ministry in 1946.  As a youthful, Calvinist and evangelical crusader in Belfast, Northern Ireland, Paisley was initially accepted by the growing fundamentalist community in Ulster.  But after exposure to the militant theology of the Reverend Carl McIntire of Collingswood, New Jersey in 1951 and after contact with McIntire’s cohorts within the International Council of Christian Churches, Paisley followed their brand of separatist and antagonistic militant fundamentalism.  During the 1950s and into the 1960s, Paisley attacked the liberalism and modernism that many Irish Presbyterian clerics and seminarians professed, and which was accepted by many other Irish Protestants.  He also crusaded against the political and theological designs of the Irish Catholic Church and the attempts by moderates within the Ulster Unionist party to reconcile with Northern Ireland’s catholic community.  During this period, Paisley formed an intimate relationship with segregationists, such as the Bob Jones family of South Carolina.  After being jailed in the summer of 1966 for protests in front of the Presbyterian General Assembly in Belfast, Paisley was anointed as God’s prophet and martyr in Ireland.  Paisley began annual tours of the American south just as the American civil rights movement and federal policy proved effective in changing the Jim Crow laws of the American south.  When the Northern Ireland civil rights movement began in the mid-1960s and demanded equal voting and economic rights for Catholics, Paisley adopted tactics that North American militants used to oppose civil rights for African Americans in the American South and became the most vocal and physical opponent to civil rights marches in Northern Ireland.”

What was Ireland’s political situation throughout Paisley’s lifetime?

“Paisley was born in 1926 in Ballymena, Northern Ireland.  So he never ‘arrived’ in Ireland as an immigrant, but as a young preacher on the streets of Belfast after the Second World War.  The political situation in Ireland at that time was a post-war Europe overshadowed by the United States and the Cold War.  Northern Ireland was firmly under control of the Ulster Unionist Party (a party that the protestant landed elite and business community dominated), but southern Ireland was in the process of converting from the Irish Free State (a Dominion of the British Crown) into the Republic of Ireland.  In response, the British government made a stronger commitment to the union between Northern Ireland and the United Kingdom.  Although the catholic community in Northern Ireland was generally complacent, there was signs of growing restlessness with Unionist rule from both Catholics and the protestant working class, a new sense of assertiveness from the Irish Catholic Church and the Irish Republican Army, and in the realm of religion, the expanding ecumenical movement.”

second-240Was it the political or religious aspect of this book that interested you more?

“The religious aspect interested me more, but naturally politics has its appeal. The conflict within Protestantism and between fundamentalists and liberal/modernists is fascinating, but so is the interaction between religiosity and the political and economic situation in Ireland from the First World War through the 1960s and up until the outbreak of the Ulster ‘Troubles.’  How all these factors reacted to the infusion of Northern American militant fundamentalism and to the call for civil rights creates a great story.”

Do you have a personal connection to the topics in this book?

“There is an indirect connection between the Northern Ireland troubles and my personal life, which drew my interest long before I entered the world of academics.  From the age twenty until returning to school in the late 1990s, I was in the music business, running an independent record label that specialized in Alternative and Americana.  This lifestyle required many trips to the British Isles during the 1980s, and with an interest in history, I was naturally attracted to the situation in Northern Ireland.”

Are you considering writing anything else in the future?

“I am constantly doing research and writing.  Currently my time has been taken up with a second manuscript on Paisley and North American militant fundamentalists and their opposition to both the American and the Northern Ireland civil rights movements.  Moreover, the second book considers the interaction between both sets of militants and both groups of civil rights activists.”

The Second Coming of Paisley: Militant Fundamentalism and Ulster Politics will be published in the next few weeks.  To purchase or learn more about Richard Lawrence Jordan’s new title, visit the Syracuse University Press website.


The Spring/Summer 2013 Catalog is Now Available!

Spring/Summer Book Catalog 2013Attention all readers!  The Syracuse University Press Spring/Summer 2013 book catalog is now available on our website.  This season we offer a wide array of new titles in series such as Sports History, Middle East Literature and Irish Studies, among others.  There is sure to be a book of interest for all!

If you’re a baseball fanatic, we have the perfect read for you.  Beyond Home Plate: Jackie Robinson on Life after Baseball, edited by Michael G. Long, is an anthology of the baseball legend’s columns in the New York Post and the New York Amsterdam News discussing his insights on his professional career and the years following.  Most of you remember Jackie as the star athlete who crossed baseball’s color line, but what you don’t know is what happened after those historic years.  For a look inside the full story of the Hall of Famer’s life, be sure to pick up Jackie Robinson’s story, Beyond Home Plate, this April.

Another interesting title coming out this March is Steel’s: A Forgotten Stock Market Scandal From the 1920’s by Dave Dyer.  This historic story takes you back into the rise and fall of the retail empire, created by Leonard Rambler Steel.  After finding thousands of original documents and photos from the L.R. Steel Company, Dave Dyer provides a first-hand account on the uncovering of a massive stock market scandal that had been forgotten by history.  With no other published accounts of this scandal, you must get your hands on Steel’s to learn the truth about the fascinating story of Buffalo-based Steel’s department store.

View the full Spring/Summer 2013 book catalog for more information on these two books and any of the other new SU Press books coming this spring!


SU Press Author Recognized for Fiction Novel

Ainé Greaney’s Irish novel, Dance Lessons, made the shortlist for the 2012 International Rubery Book Awards. The Short Story Judge, Claire Morrell, is experienced in the subject with five successful novels, among other noteworthy achievements. The International Rubery Award is held annually to reward, primarily, independent and self-publishers for their quality work.

Dance Lessons, published by Syracuse University Press in 2011, is an Irish fiction novel that takes you on an emotional journey filled with feelings of loss, regret, and transformation. Publishers Weekly states, “Greaney’s second novel (after The Big House) depicts grief with trust in the reader’s empathy. The author is able to capture emotional nuance with minimal flourish; her characters emerge as strong individuals confronting unexpected pain.” Ainé Greaney has written several award-winning short stories and numerous feature articles for the Irish Independent, the Irish Voice, Creative Nonfiction, and the Literary Review.

Greaney’s shortlisted novel will be featured in the Rubery Book Awards’ first anthology, The Tipping Point, containing a collection of the winning and shortlisted short stories. It will be available for purchase on the International Rubery Book Award website.


Enjoy one of our Irish Studies books for St. Patty’s Day!

With St. Patrick’s Day approaching this weekend, take a peek at our wonderful Irish Studies Series. We have many great Irish literature titles available to put you in the holiday mood. Some of our newer titles featured are Collaborative Dubliners, Memory Ireland Volume 1: History and Modernity, Memory Ireland Volume 2: Diaspora and Memory Practices, The Midnight Court: A Critical Edition, Samuel Beckett in the Literary Marketplace, and Dance Lessons: A Novel.

Get started by visiting the Syracuse University Press Irish Studies Series at: http://www.syracuseuniversitypress.syr.edu/books-in-print-series/irish-studies.html